What is Collaborative Problem Solving (and Why is it Important)?

If you’re new to Collaborative Problem Solving, this is a good place to start learning about the CPS model (even if you’re a CPS veteran, there’s no harm in staying fresh on the different themes).

The CPS approach was first described in Dr. Greene’s book, The Explosive Child, and subsequently in his most recent book, Lost at School. The model sets forth two major tenets: first, that social, emotional, and behavioral challenges in kids are best understood as the byproduct of lagging cognitive skills (rather than, for example, as attention-seeking, manipulative, limit-testing, or a sign of poor motivation); and second, that these challenges are best addressed by resolving the problems that are setting the stage for challenging behavior in a collaborative manner (rather than through reward and punishment programs and intensive imposition of adult will).

Organized by important tenets of the model (and in logical sequence from top to bottom), each topic area is explained by Dr. Greene via streaming video.

Kids Do Well If they Can
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Kids Do Well If they Can
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Kids Do Well If they Can
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